A Radical Approach

Life is short. Stop dreaming about the good life and start living it now!

Radical Personal Finance Will Help You Win With Life and With Money!

Radical Personal Finance is dedicated to giving you both the information and the actionable inspiration you need to significantly improve your life and lifestyle. I provide the tools you need to bridge the gap between your vision of your ideal lifestyle and the practical reality of where you stand today. Having a vision is great. But having the practical steps and tools to transform the vision into reality is even better.

What Makes Radical Personal Finance Different From Other Shows?

  • Most shows are dumbed-down to appeal to the masses who are generally financially illiterate. Radical Personal Finance focuses on in-depth content and Master’s Degree-level education delivered to you as a comprehensive curriculum of financial knowledge.
  • Most shows are too general because they need to have broad appeal across the population. Radical Personal Finance delivers specific information and ideas with specific application to unique situations. You are the one who can filter the content and simply choose what’s helpful to you. Discard any idea that isn’t helpful.
  • Most shows are too focused on inspiration without action. Dreaming your way to riches doesn’t work without action. Radical Personal Finance delivers inspirational stories and ideas that are carefully connected to the specific next actions you can take to draw closer to your goals.
  • Some shows are too focused on action steps without sufficient background information. Taking action simply because someone told you what to do without teaching you why to do it isn’t wise. Radical Personal Finance teaches you the critical thinking skills and the background knowledge to equip you to think for yourself.
  • Most shows deliver technical information that is often inaccurate due to the inexperience and ignorance of the show host. Radical Personal Finance delivers financial planning information that is very technically precise and accurate.
  • Many shows are simply boring. Radical Personal Finance isn’t boring! (But you’ll have to judge that for yourself!)

 

Connect with Joshua

Email Joshua

joshua@radicalpersonalfinance.com

Email Joshua

13 + 15 =

My Pledge to You

I will never talk down to you or insult your intelligence. You are a smart, capable, free individual.

100% of the responsibility for your financial future is on your shoulders.

And you’re up to the task! You can learn all of the skills you need to be successful!

I promise not to be another angry, yelling talk-show host telling you what to do. It’s your money and you can do whatever you want with it!

I Deliver The Tools You Need to Succeed With Money

  • Accurate financial information and education to build your financial literacy
  • Practical tips and tricks
  • Useful, up-to-date tools and techniques
  • Effective strategies that you can actually implement
  • Inspiration from the practical experiences of other people
  • Encouragement as you consistently work your plan for success

I will be here walking the journey with you and serving you with the information and inspiration you need to measurably improve your results.

Embrace your responsibility for your life and for your financial future! It’s exciting! And let’s work together to create your ideal future.

Learning with you,

sig-white

 

 

Joshua J. Sheats, MSFS

Formal Bio

Joshua J Sheats, MSFS is the world’s leading authority on integrating lifestyle goals and money goals without conflict. He teaches normal people how to seamlessly connect the science of financial planning with the joy of goal achievement. Joshua is dedicated to helping normal people achieve financial freedom by merging the creative (and crazy) ideas from the world of personal finance with the academic integrity of formal financial planning. He simplifies the complex topics of money and makes the boring financial mumbo-jumbo less boring. Joshua is an expert financial planner with a lifelong focus on advanced education. His professional degrees and designations include:

My Story

I’ve always been interested in money and personal finance.

I’m not quite sure why…I guess I just wanted to be rich! After all, who doesn’t?

From an early age, I spent a lot of time reading about personal finance. I probably should have spent more time outside playing sports but I didn’t. I was a bookworm and spent my time inside reading about personal finance.

I took action on what I read, too.

On my 18th birthday, I specifically remember sitting at my kitchen table opening my first Roth IRA and applying for my first credit card to build my credit score.

I dutifully saved 10% or so of my income into the Roth IRA whenever I could. (College tuition bills got in the way for a few years.) I just knew I would be a multi-millionaire at 65 because I was applying the compound interest charts to my own situation.

And, I carefully focused on raising my credit score and my credit limits. In college, I remember having almost $100,000 of credit line available to me on about 4 credit cards. My thought process was that I wanted to be ready in case I needed to purchase an investment house on my credit cards. #YouthfulFoolishness

College Years and Getting Out Of Debt

I paid my way through college with a combination of academic scholarships, part-time job income, and student loans. While I was in college, my brother gave me Dave Ramsey’s book “Total Money Makeover.” I read it three times and decided to get out of debt.

Writing the check two-weeks before I graduated from college to pay off my student loans from Sallie Mae. Debt free, baby!

Writing the check two-weeks before I graduated from college to pay off my student loans from Sallie Mae. Debt free, baby!

My goal was to pay off my student loans before I graduated.

During my senior year I worked 40 hours per week, took 19 hours of class to finish my degree “on time,” cash-flowed my senior-year tuition, paid off my credit cards, and sent a check to Sallie Mae two weeks before I graduated to pay off the balance of my student loans.

I was tired! But it felt really good.

I understood the power of focus and a great plan. I learned to carefully budget my money, my time, and my energy and apply those things toward a specific goal. It worked!

The Benefits of An Emergency Fund

After college I spent one more year working in corporate America for a marketing and brand-management consulting firm.

Although I enjoyed the insights and exposure to some of the world’s leading consumer brands, I soon knew that the corporate world wasn’t a good fit for me.

Fortunately, I was laid off from that job in a group layoff in the summer of 2008, six months before I had planned to leave.

Looking back, I’m thankful for the push out the door. Knowing what was happening with the financial crisis in January of 2009, I’m not sure I would have had the courage to leave of my own accord!

Thankfully, good financial planning helped me to make a smooth transition out of that job. I had no debt, low living expenses, and six months of expenses saved in the bank. I had time to make an intelligent transition to a new opportunity.

While I was working the corporate job that I wasn’t enjoying, I had made careful notes of what I wanted in a job or business.

I had a list of hundreds of ideas of different jobs and businesses that sounded fun to me. Most importantly, I had five clear criteria for what I wanted in my next job:

  1. I wanted to be paid for results only, not for my time.
  2. I wanted to build an income that would continue, even if I stopped working for a time.
  3. I wanted to build a business that would have equity that I could sell at the end and cash out rather than something without value.
  4. I didn’t want to be restricted to one place for my work environment. I wanted geographical freedom.
  5. I didn’t want to do the same thing day-in and day-out. I wanted variety in my life.

After showing that list to a mentor of mine, he recommended I consider going into the financial services business. His son had done an internship at Northwestern Mutual, so he referred me to his son’s manager.

How I Got Into the Financial Services Industry

I never intended to go into the financial services business. Due to all of my reading of personal finance books, I had a very negative opinion of the industry. As far as I was concerned, financial advisors were expensive scam artists and I could do better on my own. I was a committed Do-It-Yourselfer.

But, I had such a great initial interview with the advisor at Northwestern Mutual and learned so much that I simply didn’t know that I decided to investigate the opportunity.

I interviewed with various firms but ultimately decided to join Northwestern Mutual, the first company with which I interviewed.

I didn’t know if I was going to stick with the business for the long term, but I knew I wanted to learn and develop my sales skills (I had a goal of developing highly compensated skills and sales ability is an almost-guaranteed winner) and I decided this would be a good way to build them.

I joined Northwestern Mutual in the fall of 2008 and began building my practice.

How I Built My Financial Planning Business

Since I had no formal educational background in financial topics, I focused primarily on insurance sales for my first three years while building my knowledge and expertise with investment topics.

I became an expert on life insurance, disability income insurance, and long-term care insurance.

I built my business the old-fashioned way with what is know n in the industry as “referred-lead prospecting.” Essentially, I asked all of my friends, acquaintances, and clients to introduce me to other people they thought I might be helpful to and over time I build a client base.

Meanwhile, I studied and built my knowledge and expertise in investment topics and in formal financial planning.

On January 24, 2009 I passed my Series 6 licensing exam which was the first of the necessary investment licenses for me.

On January 24, 2009 I passed my Series 6 licensing exam which was the first of the necessary investment licenses for me.

In addition to my state-sponsored 2-15 life/health/annuities insurance license, I completed the:

  • Series 6,
  • Series 63,
  • and Series 65 investment licenses.

I studied and gained my formal financial planning credentials in this order:

  • Chartered Life Underwriter
  • Certified Financial Planner
  • Chartered Financial Consultant
  • Chartered Advisor for Senior Living
  • Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy
  • Registered Health Underwriter
  • Registered Employee Benefits Consultant

I also completed a formal Master’s Degree in Financial Planning from The American College of Financial Planning in Pennsylvania.

Building a successful financial services practice is incredibly difficult. Industry-wide, only about 10% of those who set out to do so succeed for the long term. The vast majority of advisors decide it’s not for them and quit to do other things.

I took this picture of my dashboard clock on February 17, 2009 as I left my office to drive home at 1:09am after studying and working on financial plans for the next day's presentations. This was not an unusual occurrence in the early years.

I took this picture of my dashboard clock on February 17, 2009 as I left my office to drive home at 1:09am after studying and working on financial plans for the next day’s presentations. This was not an unusual occurrence in the early years.

During the beginning phase of the business, you work incredibly hard for very little money.

It’s only toward the middle and back end of your career that your income more than compensates you for the early hard work.

I made it as a financial advisor. I succeeded and got through the most difficult first five years.

I was never the firm’s highest producer, but I did well and built a healthy practice that was providing the lifestyle freedom I desired for myself and my family.

Most importantly I had full control over my time, my schedule, who I worked with, and when and how much I worked. I worked hard but I also took generous amounts of time off. I was focused on building my lifestyle business.

The Problem and Growing Dissatisfaction

But, I grew increasingly frustrated with financial education available to the general public. The more I learned from the formal side of financial planning, the more I felt I had been tricked, lied-to, and mis-educated by mainstream personal financial educators.

The deeper I dug, the more I realized the answers were never as simple as the pundits claimed they were.

I felt like someone should do a better job of educating people and I searched in vain for someone who was doing it.

I couldn’t find what I wanted.

The problem is:

  • The majority of financial advisors with the formal educational background necessary to teach financial planning on an in-depth level are barred from speaking to the public due to the industry rules governing their public-facing communication, or
  • They are simply not interested in taking time away from their highly lucrative businesses to work in the relatively low-paid profession of education, or
  • They are perhaps so technically competent as to be insufferably boring.

As I watched the development of podcasting technology, I realized that the future of media communications is not over terrestrial radio waves but over the Internet connection.

After record 10 episodes of my own show as an initial test, I discovered that I love recording audio education and that I wasn’t terrible at it.

With some of my fellow Toastmasters after winning an area speaking contest.

With some of my fellow Toastmasters after winning an area speaking contest.

I already knew I loved to teach.

I had already worked hard to build some effective public speaking skills. I had spent several years involved in Toastmaster’s International, working hard to build my skills as a speaker.

I already knew I loved consuming audio educational products. I had spent years listening to 30 to 50 hours of audio education per week and had spent thousands of dollars on educational products to hone my skills.

Why not go and create the financial education for others that I longed so desperately to have?

In 2014 I made the difficult decision to close my financial planning practice so that I could create better financial media.

On July 1, 2014 I launched Radical Personal Finance as a 5-day per week podcast.

My Vision

Essentially, my vision is simply to create the kind of show I wish had existed when I was 15 years old and desperately trying to learn everything I could about money and finance. It’s that simple.

I have a Master’s degree in financial planning. My goal is to create a body of work that can lead someone from a place of zero knowledge of personal money management and finance to all of the knowledge equivalent to a Master’s degree in personal finance.

The Future

I’m learning as I go and working hard to develop and perfect my skills as a teacher, host, broadcaster, and entrepreneur.

Thank you for listening and for supporting me in my efforts.

I’m glad to have you here on this journey with me!

I value each and every one of you who gives me the honor of your time and attention. It means the world to me that you trust me.

I promise you that I will never betray that trust.

Sincerely,

Joshua

Please understand that I will not be able to respond to every comment. RPF Community Guidelines.

73 Comments

  1. trevor

    I’m glad you started this podcast – I’ve been searching for a “radical” personal finance podcast for a while – Dave Ramsey is just a bit too rudimentary.

    II’d like to talk to you about helping with the podcast in some way, if you’re looking for someone to help with the project. I’ve left my email + web URL

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks Trevor, glad to have you here. I hope we can deliver what you’re looking for! I checked out your stuff–great ideas! I like re-purposing and re-using something as simple as a 5-gallon bucket. Keep it up.

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      • trevor

        Thanks – you may be surprised that I make a living from that site. I certainly like to think that qualifies as radical 🙂

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  2. freganito

    Great to have you back. I think your show has huge potential. Topics of interest: hard assets such as platinum. Is it possible to use IRA to buy hard assets? Money supply basics such as inflation. Why is this topic always presented as a complex topic when its really simple? Why do so many people misunderstand it? Why can a credit card company get such high percentages but savings accounts get less than 4%?

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks for the questions! Those are all great topics. And, I’m interested in all of them! Using an IRA to buy hard assets is a very popular question…I think I’ll do an entire show on that. (Short answer is yes, it’s possible. No, I wouldn’t do it.) Inflation and money supply are super important topics. I’m pretty comfortable discussing gold and silver but I don’t know anything about platinum. Do you know anyone who is really an expert in investing in hard assets like platinum? Ever read anyone talk about who sounds intelligent? I’d love to interview them about it.

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  3. RadicalPersonalFinance

    freganito Thanks for the questions! Those are all great topics. And, I’m interested in all of them! Using an IRA to buy hard assets is a very popular question…I think I’ll do an entire show on that. (Short answer is yes, it’s possible. No, I wouldn’t do it.) Inflation and money supply are super important topics. I’m pretty comfortable discussing gold and silver but I don’t know anything about platinum. Do you know anyone who is really an expert in investing in hard assets like platinum? Ever read anyone talk about who sounds intelligent? I’d love to interview them about it.

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  4. gobankingrates

    Hello Joshua!
    Are you going to FinCon 2014? Love to have your opinion…
    We have always been big fans of yours.
    That’s why I wanted to personally invite you to participate
    in GOBankingRates and FINCON 14 Summer Savings Challenge.
    We’re asking bloggers and experts to share their best
    money-saving tip in a short video 1 min maximum clip. (It can be something you
    easily shoot on your SmartPhone!
    No savings idea is too small or too crazy and I’m positive
    will be great!
    The grand prize winner will receive $1,000, acknowledgement
    in a national press release and featured with the other three finalist at
    FINCON 14.
    Please let me know if you will be able to participate and if
    you have any questions.
    I’m excited to see
    what your favorite money saving tip is! (:

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks so much for commenting! Yes, I want to shoot one and submit it…just have no idea how to do it in less than 1 minute!!! 🙂 I’ll try to shoot one tomorrow if I can!

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      • Joshua Sheats

        FYI, I just sent you guys my video via Google Drive. Let me know if you have any problems downloading it!

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  5. ajwilson07

    Hey, Joshua!

    I’ve recently started listening to the podcast and am enjoying the content. I’ve disagreed with you on some topics, but have had my opinion changed on many occasions by hearing to your unique viewpoint. 

    You are always asking for feedback and comments, so here’s mine… I listened to your first (11th?) podcast, where you explained your planned format for certain topics on certain days of the week, and I understand your goal is to have content released every day. You mentioned that your goal is to release content every day and have listeners pick-and-choose the episodes they’d like to hear.

    For me though, I’m simply overwhelmed by your content. Every episode I’ve heard, I’ve been interested in the topic. Sometimes, I’ve skipped episodes (the personal balance sheets) but then you reference them in later shows (the wealth formula). Between yours, and the other 10 or so podcasts I listen to, I physically can’t listen to your show more than once or twice per week. If you’d focus on one or two really high quality (1 hour-ish) posts each week, it would be much more digestible for someone like me. Otherwise, a lot of your content ends up being deleted, even though I’m interested.

    This is all just my opinion, and I understand if you disagree. Otherwise, keep up the good work!

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks so much for the comment! I really appreciate it! I will note your comment as a vote for switching to a weekly format!

      I am aware of that as being a potential problem for some listeners and I may adjust what I’m doing in the future. I may lower the number of shows per week, even to as low as one show per week.

      I know it’s uncommon for podcasters to do daily shows, but I want to provide an alternative to mainstream radio, especially mainstream finance radio. Dave Ramsey is on for 3 hours a day, Clark Howard for 2, Suze Orman for 1 (TV) and Ric Edelman for 2. All of them have much larger audiences than whoever the guy is on your local AM station at 8am on Saturday morning. That leads me to believe there’s a market for more, daily content.

      The difference is that their shows do not build on each other. You can tune in to just about any half hour segment you want to listen to and it’ll be about the same as another segment because it’s primarily listener questions…and people ask the same questions over and over again.

      I have a hunch that some of the people who do have the time for a daily show will want to hear something different than what’s available on mainstream radio. I just don’t know if I’m right or not!

      At any rate, I’m not very good as a host yet and I need to get better quickly. I’ll get a lot better a lot faster by doing it a lot more.

      At this point in time, I plan to release 100 episodes and then poll the audience to see how much people are listening to and if they prefer me to switch to another format.

      In the meantime, I’m not offended if you just skip what you can’t consume!

      Thanks so much for listening!

      (And, by the way, what has been the concept we disagreed on that you found most challenging to grapple with? I’d love to know!)

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      • Katynka

        I actually like the longer format. I try to run every day for about an hour (see: Invest in your health podcast) and love to listen to it while running.

        It is great to have a different viewpoint from most other financial podcasts. I like the balance of technical and practical.

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        • Joshua Sheats

          Thanks, Kaynka! I appreciate the feedback! It really helps.

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Hey Chris, I checked out your article! I’m thrilled to be listed in that group! You’re gettin’ what I’m preachin’! I intend to provide a complete masters degree education in financial planning on my podcast over time. I’m figuring out how to do it effectively, but I figure I’m uniquely qualified to deliver the education! (After September, I’ll actually have finished my own “official” masters degree in financial planning and I intend to teach everything I know!)

      Also, thanks for the comment on information overload–that’s the number one comment that I get. I’m working to figure out how to be a better teacher of the information. (And my rant in today’s show wasn’t about your comment…I’ve heard it from a lot of people.)

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  6. apthompson

    Greetings Josuha,
    I have been enjoying your show and the information you provide.  I can tell you are very passionate about the subject.  Keep up the good work.
    As a side note, I love your opening/closing song.  Do you have the artist/title information for the song?

    Thanks!

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    • Joshua Sheats

      I appreciate the kind comments! Yes. The Song is “La Mezcla de Rojo” and it is by Dano at http://www.danosongs.com

      I just went to his site to give you a direct link to the song but for some reason he’s taken it off the page. You might need to write to him to ask to buy the rights to it.

      Also, make sure you listen to Episode 42, which is an interview with Dan-O himself and his music business… http://radicalpersonalfinance.com/42/

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  7. Bjohnso3

    Informed of your podcast by mutual KS friends. Excellent show. I’m a daily listener. Thanks for great content.

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  8. ChrisEE

    ChrisEE 
    Hey Josh.

    Just wanted to let you know that the article is featured on today’s RockStar Finance page.  Hopefully this will send you a bunch of website traffic and new listeners to the podcast. 

    Cheers!
    Chris

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    • Joshua Sheats

      That’s awesome, Chris! Thanks!

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  9. ManuelFrancoTorres

    Hi Joshua!

    I am definitely becoming addicted to your show. For me it was a great discovery to find a podcast that talks about all the stuff I like to think about. Sometimes I feel like an alien among friends or colleagues that think that all way of thinking out of the main stream is wrong, specially about economy and lifestyle. 

    I have a topic suggestion for you. I am kind of obsessed with a psychological classification of people called Enneagram. I got to know about it in a conference by the HR director of a Spanish company called Inditex (this is a big one..) and he said that they use this classification to find the right type of person for each position. I was a bit skeptic but I gave it a try. I realized that my way of thinking and the way I see life completely fall into one of the nine categories, and many people I know can be clearly classified into one of the others. This way of understanding reality have consequences in our actions, and learning more about this classification I learned why I do what I do and why other people do what they do, even if they are not aware of why. So my suggestion is to make a show about how our type of personality defines our posture about money, risk and life style.

    I am not sure I was able to make clearly my point. Thanks for an awesome show. I will keep on listening every day. And sorry for the grammar. Her a Spanish living in Norway 🙂

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  10. Deano Debboe

    “My education was interrupted only by my schooling.” — Sir Winston Churchill.

    I thought you may enjoy this classic quote. Ultimately, the value of education, whether formal or self-directed, comes from the effort and achievement of the individual.

    Thanks for your very informative podcast. I greatly appreciate the effort and the product.

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    • Joshua Sheats

      That is a good one! I’d forgotten about that quote!

      Thanks for the comments and for listening!

      Just curious, how did you originally hear about the show?

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  11. Andre

    Hey Joshua! I think I found your podcast a month or two ago via Jacob’s ERE blog. I’m finally caught up now after some serious binge listening. I think that says plenty about how awesome your work is. I was wondering if you were planning to have a meetup while you’re in New Orleans for FinCon? That’d be pretty neat. Thanks for the constant inspiration and motivation.

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    • Joshua Sheats

      You know what? I hadn’t thought about that. But I just decided to do it!!! Stay tuned for details!

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      • Andre

        Any updates? Heard you mention FinCon again on the podcast and was wondering if I missed the details.

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        • Joshua Sheats

          I’m going to host the meetup at 4pm today. Sorry for the late notice. Was hard to figure out the schedule.

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          • Joshua Sheats

            Reach out to me on twitter.

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  12. Chenell

    Joshua,

    I found your podcast last week and cannot stop listening. I appreciate you having more than one show per week, it just shows your dedication and serious knowledge about the topic.

    I love hearing all of your shows and still have a bit of catching up to do. The insight you provide is priceless. It’s great to have such a strong ally in a world that generally looks down at those of us who challenge the norms.

    You rock – keep up the great work!
    Chenell

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks so much!!! That makes my morning! I love doing the shows…it really stretches me to figure out how to clearly communicate complex ideas and concepts.

      How did you find the show?

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  13. Greg

    Hey Joshua-

    I’m always looking for high quality, relevant podcasts and your’s certainly fits the bill. The Wal-Mart one and your retire-on-a-million episodes have both been particularly interesting.

    The one downside for me is the length. I feel like if you cut the length by 1/4 to 1/3 you could get it more into the size that I and others could consume in a day. As it is, the hour and a half is a bit too much to swallow at times.

    Anyways, keep it up!

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Greg,

      Thanks for the comments! Those two shows were two of my favorites. No worries on the length comments…I’m working hard on getting better. Frankly, it’s primarily a matter of capacity. The shorter the show, the longer the amount of time needed to prepare and the more detailed the process of preparation. (At least if I want to be clear and convey an actual point.) I’m working hard at my craft to tighten it up. I appreciate your being here for the journey!

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  14. Donovan

    Hey Joshua,

    I just found your site this week, and have been listening to your shows pretty much all day long since I found it. I work from home and have been listening to you rather than my normal Netflix documentaries that I have on while I work. Your voice is very professional, and soothing unlike several other finance podcasters that I have found unbearable due to their voice and interview style. When you interject during an interview the information you provide is well said and pertinent. I wanted you to know that you are appreciated, and I look forward to your future shows. I find the length of the podcasts to be ideal, as you are able to get into the details and really analyze a specific topic. I particularly enjoyed hearing the dialogue between you and Jacob Lund Fisker! I just finished my work and am headed to the airport in just 6 hours (have to sleep within that time period too), but wanted to post a comment to you to let you know how appreciated you are. Please keep the podcasts coming. When I return from my trip, I will definitely post a review on Apple for you.

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Donovan,

      Thanks so much for being here! I appreciate the encouraging comments. Stick around and the show will keep getting better and better–I’ve never done this before so there’s a steep learning curve to it. Comments like yours keep me going!

      As far as the length, that’s really what I’m working towards. I want to make the show the perfect length for each topic!

      Have a safe trip and thanks for the [potential] review!

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  15. Erin

    Hi Joshua,
    I listen to your podcasts frequently and enjoy them, especially the interviews with folks who have chosen extreme lifestyles as compared to the average or mainstream. And the detailed math you present in many shows is also very helpful.
    In one of your recent podcasts, you briefly discuss looking into creating your own index fund of sorts in order to avoid investing in stocks such as Monsanto. I’m right there with you. I currently have most of my money in an S&P 500 Vanguard index fund and just looked at the companies listed on the S&P (can’t believe I didn’t look at this sooner). While not all of them, there are many listed that I’d rather not support. I love the value gained with an index fund with low fees. Do you have thoughts or anything you’ve learned yet as to how to select and create your own index fund? And specifically, if you’ve found a way to do so, can you explain how the fees would work with such a set up?
    Thanks and keep the great shows coming!
    Erin

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Erin,

      I really don’t have a recommendation on this yet. It’s a personal project of mine but I really haven’t figured out exactly what I’m going to do. The list of companies I have issues with is really long!

      The best idea I’ve found so far is the idea that David sent me after the show: Motif Investing http://www.motifinvesting.com

      I haven’t used them but I did spend some time chatting with their reps at #FinCon14 last week and they have an interesting product.

      Let me know if you like what they offer or if you have other ideas. I’ll report back on the show if I decide what I’m going to do with my own accounts.

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  16. Brendan

    Joshua,
    I started to listen to you podcast a few weeks ago and found them very interesting. I think the content is refreshing because your clearly understand the financial planning industry (subject matter expert) but provide thought provoking alternatives to the mainstream media – which I view as very repetitive and basic. I now listen to your podcast to/from work instead of other financial discussions. Although I am still catching up (as quick as possible), had a thought for a future show:
    – Disruptive technologies (3D, self driving cars, robotics, etc) and impact on future jobs. What does the work force look like in 20 years for our kids – financial impact based on career you/your kids chose.

    Thanks!
    Brendan

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Brendan,

      I’ve added your show ideas to my list…I’ve been working on an outline for a career show but it’s tough! I want to be accurate and it’s tough for me to figure out exactly what I want to share!

      I’m really thankful to have you as a listener. Keep the ideas and comments coming as you have them!

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  17. Todd

    Hey Joshua,

    Thanks for doing these podcasts. I recently found your show from an off the Grid Facebook post about the $80,000 a year farming podcast you did and now I have been listening to your shows on my way to and from work for the past few days so i have a lot of catching up to do. What about posting cliff notes for each podcast after a certain amount of time in case someone was interested in a podcast but didn’t have all of the time to listen to every one of them?

    I told a few people to start listening as well including a financial adviser friend who seemed interested. I am 33 with a wife and 2 year old, a great saver and have a moderate amount of savings built up. I am just starting to figure out how best to invest it so your show came along at the right time to help guide me in my financial journey to independence as well as help our daughter learn everything she needs to know to gain her own financial independence. I hope to be working for myself, un-schooling our child, living in an untied to utilities Earthship and just enjoying my life with my family and friends.

    Thanks
    Todd

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    • Todd

      sorry I didn’t look closer at your older archived podcasts. I heard you this morning referring to your notes while listening to the minimum wage millionaire and realized you already give notes on the site for them. Keep up the good work. I will keep listening and spreading the word.

      Todd

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      • Joshua Sheats

        No worries, mate. I do my best to post quick show notes–it’s an area I’d like to improve. I just don’t have the time right now to make the detailed notes. I hope to improve this as I build more capacity to do so.

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    • Joshua Sheats

      By the way, super glad to hear about your FI plan! If I were willing to move to where I could build an earthship, I’d be doing what you’re doing. Working for myself, educating my kids, living in an earthship and enjoying life! We’ll do it together! (Just I won’t be in an earthship…I don’t think!)

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  18. Tyler

    Joshua,

    Love the show. I am finally getting some in-depth exposure to finance and life skills.

    You recently talked about becoming a CFP. I will be entering a different field (law) but most of your advice applies perfectly to starting a legal practice as well. I was wondering if you could speak a little to mentorship: both as a mentor and as a mentee. How should professionals approach persons who they view as role models in their field, and what qualities should they look for in a mentor? What about expectations of the relationship? What words of advice would you have to mentees?

    I enjoy hearing your perspectives on finance, the financial education you provide, and the guiding principles you discuss that I can apply in my profession.

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Hey Tyler,

      That’s a great question. I’ll try to address it on a future Q&A show for you!

      Joshua

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  19. Brett

    Joshua! Really enjoy the podcast and catchy intro/outro music! Working my way through the archives (only on 20 or so). I scanned the rest of the podcast titles/synopsis but didn’t see anything on the subject of EIUL (Equity Indexed Universal Life Policies). Was wondering if you knew anything about these and if you think they are a good idea? I heard about it on another podcast a while back and remember something to the affect of these plans having a guaranteed “no loss” or something like that – i.e. market is down 10% in ayear you just get 0 gains. If the market is good 20% that year, you are capped at how much you can gain…

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks, Brett. I haven’t covered EIUL. In fact, I haven’t talked much at all about any kind of life insurance planning yet.

      I know a lot about them and I think they have a place. But there’s a lot more to it than just the guaranteed floor and the market cap.

      It will take me a while until I get to the point where I can teach through them on the show…and I can’t give you any specific advice in this format here.

      I’d suggest that you simply learn, learn, learn about all aspects of your planning needs and be very careful to read and fully understand the policy you’re considering. It’s a mixed bag and you need to be fully informed on the subject. Dig deep and make sure you fully understand it. Be careful.

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  20. Jim K

    Joshua. You are doing an excellent job and after listening to many, many hours of your shows, I was moved to post a comment. It is funny how you start to get to know someone with these podcasts and I really enjoy the fact that you let your personality come through. You are genuine in your thoughts and opinions and although I may not agree with everything, I am totally hooked on most shows. I fear I will run out of podcasts to listen to but with your daily posts, I do not think that will be a problem 
    My wife and I watch old movies as couple time and we watched “Holiday” with Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn (1938). If you like these kinds of things, you would enjoy the storyline.
    I am a lifetime learner and an entrepreneur at heart (CPA, marketer, RE agent, house flipper, landlord, etc) and after moving away from being a W-2 guy 18 years ago, I will never go back to working for someone else.
    Love the format and content and most of the ideas are very interesting. If you start a community, let us all know. You should have no problem having this fully support you financially. Keep up the good work and thanks for sharing. Jim

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks, Jim! I’ll check it out! And thank you for the encouragement. I appreciate your listening!

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  21. Claudia B

    I just want to say…you have the best intro music in the podcast world (I listen to A LOT of podcasts)!

    Oh yea, love the show too 🙂

    Have a great one!

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thanks, Claudia! You may notice that it has just gotten better! I finally figured out that I had a bad cable and half the sound wasn’t showing up!

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  22. Gary B

    Joshua,

    Just wanted to say thank you for your pod costs, I just found them two days ago and can’t seem to get enough of them. You are a breath of fresh air, this type of education is long overdue!

    Many thanks, to you and all your guests.

    A very happy listener…Gary B

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thank you, Gary. I really, really appreciate hearing that!

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  23. kyle

    Joshua,

    I am interested in becoming more intelligent in regards to tax strategies and the like. My employer offers a tuition reimbursement benefit of a few thousand a year. Do you think it would be worth it for me to take some online or night classes that would be in the Certified Financial Planner curriculum? I have a bachelor’s in Biology, so I haven’t taken any finance classes. Are there other resources or books I could just read on my own to get the benefit?

    Thanks,
    Kyle

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Hey Kyle, I received this question from a listener in the past and tried to answer it on this show: http://radicalpersonalfinance.com/65/

      In short, my answer is probably not. The class format of financial planning as a science probably will do little to help you get richer. I think it’s smarter to focus on becoming a leader in your industry (investing in your career…take classes that will help you with that) if you like your industry or investing in a business that you’d rather have. Then, study investing as it relates to whatever strategy you choose to pursue. Easier and better to do that with books, not textbooks or classes. Hire a financial planner for a consultation if you need to.

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      • Calman Prussin

        Joshua,

        First of all congratulations on an incredibly well done and valuable podcast. I find your analyses of personal finance thoughtful and compelling.

        I found the comments of your recent find your recent guest Steven Harris interesting. However, as a physician scientist, I found his comments regarding recycling and climate change basically him speaking out of his rear end. Not sure why you could not smell it.

        One of the features of your approach I value is that it is evidence based in regard to personal finance. So why suddenly buy the snake oil of this guy in regard to recycling and climate change without data? Where was his data? You would never allow someone to talk about financial issues without some facts to back it up.

        Recycling: Although I have no doubt he is correct that big waste companies make lots of money on recycling, he is not correct about recycling being a waste. Please take a look at this article in The Economist, not exactly a lefty publication. In particular, the cost of Aluminum (which he did not even mention) is about 90% due to the energy it takes to create the metal from bauxite.
        http://www.economist.com/node/9249262

        Climate change: I’m an immunologist with chemistry training, so honestly, I do not have the technical training to understand the critical details whether climate change is due to humans. What I do know is that in a recent paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (an extremely prestigious journal), 1,372 of the most actively publishing climate scientists were asked if they thought anthropogenic (human caused) climate change was responsible for most of the recent warming. 97-98% of those surveyed were in agreement that most of the change was due to man. That is either a huge scientific conspiracy or a huge amount of ignorance on the part of your guest.
        http://www.pnas.org/content/107/27/12107.abstract

        Keep up the good work, but try to keep to the facts.

        Cal-Man

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  24. Chris Keator

    Hey, I just found your podcast yesterday and was up til 3am listening to it. Awesome stuff!

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Awesome, Chris! Go to bed, now! You need to invest in your sleep! 🙂

      Seriously, thanks for the compliment.

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  25. Christian

    Hi Joshua!

    Greetings from Sweden and congrats on a great podcast! I discovered it some months back and I am working my way through older episodes as well as the newer ones as there is a lot of great material to plough through! However, I don´t think I would continue to listen to you for all the great advices in the world hadn´t it been for you presenting and explaining the topics in an enthusiastic “no-bullshit-kind-of-way”-style. Your podcast feels honest, direct and genuinely caring – VERY UNIQUE.

    Now to my question that I would appreciate your thoughts and advice on. Some time ago I quit work at an investment bank after a handful of years at the company to seek new challenges outside the firm as a private wealth manager(PWM)/private banker/family office advisor. I recently passed the third and final level of the CFA program where a lot of time is devoted to PWM. I want to learn more about the PWM and planning business so I´m wondering if I should pursue a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designation…? What did you learn going through the program and how much overlap is it with the CFA curriculum? Basically, is it worth the time and money?

    Many thanks Joshua and keep up the good work!

    Thanks,
    Christian

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Hey Christian,

      Thanks for the compliments and the question! I appreciate the kind words!

      I haven’t taken the CFA or any of its preparatory courses, but from looking at the topic list and reading about the exam, I’d say they’re quite different.

      In my understanding, the CFA is all about portfolio management. Thus, it would be helpful for anyone involved in actually directing portfolios, whether individual or institutional.

      The CFP exam is all about financial planning and has very little about portfolio management. About the deepest it goes on portfolio management would be to define something like the Black-Scholles model–but there are no calculations on how to actually apply it.

      You said in your question that you’re interested in a PWM/Family-Office-Advisor role. Given that, I would say yes, do the CFP. (It’s nowhere near as much work as the CFA.)

      If you were to stay on the institutional side then I’d say there’s little value in your studying the curriculum.

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      • Christian

        Thanks for the reply Joshua!

        Valuable to hear your thoughts on the CFA vs CFP matter. I definately will consider the CFP designation going forward but first, time to listen to your review of Tony Robbin´s latest book.

        Cheers!

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        • Joshua Sheats

          🙂 It’s a monster. Enjoy!

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  26. Drew

    Josh,
    I really enjoy your show and like the outsiders idea. With that said I can’t subscribe because, out of principle I can’t pay for extra content not available yet. I am not a consultant but, you did mention you wouldn’t mind some guidance on the online business route. I don’t have a lot of experience with online business but, grew up around a general aviation environment around business owners. I have also, worked with a lot of small businesses throughout the years. I am currently working on my MBA and think I could have some guidance that maybe could help.
    So here is my thought; we record a conversation about improving your brand and post the conversation on the outsiders site so, there is some content then I can bring myself to pay for the outsiders site and you may get some guidance on how to get your business going full time. Worst case scenario the conversation bombs and you don’t post it.
    Let me know what you think,
    Drew

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Hey Drew! That sounds like a great idea! Email me and we’ll set it up. I appreciate the help!

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  27. Craig

    Josh,
    Your podcast is entertaining, intelligent, and most importantly thought provoking. You are in the midst of creating one heck of a legacy for yourself through the approach you take towards the variety of topics discussed on your show. Your passion for establishing your own contribution to society, in addition to your conspicuous zest for life, add unquantifiable value to your product.

    Thanks.

    Craig

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Thank you, Craig! That’s a super encouraging comment for me. I appreciate your listening!

      Joshua

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  28. Kevin

    Hey,
    Love the show and I am learning a lot from it. I haven’t listened to al the shows yet(though I’m getting there :-)) so I apologize in advance if you’ve already discussed this.
    I am looking into infinite banking/B.O.Y. Not as a primary strategy for building wealth but rather as a supplemental strategy. I especially am interested because in my culture we(the parents) pay for our children’s wedding and this could be a great way to finance them as I know the money will be there when I need it.
    I would love to hear your thoughts in the matter and if you could possibly do a detailed analysis as only you can, that would be awesome.
    Thanx,
    Kevin

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    • Joshua Sheats

      Hey Kevin,

      Thanks for listening! It’s on my topic list. I’ll try to get to it at some point this year. At the moment, I generally don’t see the point for most “normal” people. There’s simply not enough tax liability for it to be worth considering.

      I’ll let you know if my opinion changes when I read the books. (I’ve never bothered to actually read them, so that’s why I hedge my opinion.)

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      • Kevin

        Thank you. I’m looking forward. I’ll try to be patient. Keep up the good no great work. I’m very excited to have found this podcast. So far every episode has been very educational and inspirational.

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  29. gary

    New to your podcasts, but so far…they’re awesome. Intelligent, useful and very nice tone/speed. Eager to listen to more and dump the others I’ve been listening to before. Thanks Gary

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  30. Anon

    Great site Joshua. You have a truly interesting perspective — lifestyle design, frugality/simplicity, ER/FI, personal and business development, and sensible financial planning with a focus on human capital. Have you considered coming to the next Boglehead conference (its 75% sold out but your perspective in the breakout sessions would be refreshing: https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=159719&newpost=2408766

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  31. George

    Love your podcast! Really amazing work.

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  32. Bill Holth

    I just found your podcasts today. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

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    • Joshua Sheats

      And thanks for listening!

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